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Ben C. Blackwell:

I needed to hear something this funny today. I lived the story.

Originally posted on Crux Sola:

I was pretty well-entertained for 8 minutes watching Mike Bird’s parody of the Kickstarter Campaign for the Bibliotheca “elegent” Bible project. In order to fully appreciate the cleverness of Bird’s performance, you need to watch the original.

http://www.bibliotheca.co/#about

One more thing: Mike, you have way too much time on your hands, but kudos for having a great A/V team!

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Back at our Paul and Judaism conference here at Houston Baptist University, David Capes interviewed N.T. Wright about his recently published Paul and the Faithfulness of God. The interview is at HBU’s The City Podcast.

Also, be on the look out for HBU’s next conference: The Church and Early Christianity on April 16-18, 2005 (sorry for the old link the new conference website didn’t get updated as promised yet!). We’ll focus on the development of the early Church in the first two or three centuries. In addition to our fantastic line-up of plenary speakers–John Barclay, Ben Witherington, and Everett Ferguson–we will also solicit papers from scholars as well. See the conference website: hbu.edu/theologyconference.

HT: David Capes

The meaning of Romans 7 finally uncovered:

I was once alive apart from teaching, but when the end of the semester came, grading came alive and I died.

The very job that promised life proved to be death to me.

For grading, seizing an opportunity through the teaching, deceived me and through it killed me.

So the teaching is holy, and the classroom is holy and righteous and good.

Did that which is good, then, bring death to me? By no means! It was grading, producing death in me through what is good, in order that grading might be shown to be sin, and through the classroom might become sinful beyond measure.

For we know that the teaching is spiritual, but I am of the flesh, sold under grading.

I’m not clever enough to come up with this, but Marc Cortez is. (And on a more serious note, his little volume Theological Anthropology: A Guide for the Perplexed is really helpful.)

Ben C. Blackwell:

This is sure to be an interesting conference.

Originally posted on A Word in Edgewise:

 

A friend of mine Edward Fudge is hosting a conference this summer, July 11-12, at the Lanier Theological Library.  The title is “Rethinking Hell.”  Edward Fudge, as you may know, has written the definitive book on hell as annihilation.  Here is an announcement I received recently on it.  If you are in or near Houston this summer, you should plan on attending.  Go to the site http://www.rethinkinghell.com for more details. 

Eleven weeks from now, registrants from countries on three or four continents arrive in Houston for the first ever Rethinking Hell Conference. Awaiting them will be a schedule that includes high academic prowess and ground-level practice, historical exhibits, a live podcast interview with audience involvement, screening of a feature movie, and never-before-seen excerpts from an international documentary film now in progress.

All this happens in a world-renowned venue, the Lanier Theological Library and Chapel, whose professional staff is accustomed…

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Ben C. Blackwell:

Good stuff here. Thanks Brian for the recommendations….

Originally posted on the archives near Emmaus:

This week’s recommendations:

5. The Growth of Global Pentecostalism by Marc Cortez

4.a Jesus the Widower by James McGrath and b. Jesus’ Wife Fragment Latest from Mark Goodacre

3. Richard B. Hays by J. Ross Wagner

2. Boyarin on the Jewishness of High Christology by Nick Norelli

1. Fundamentalist Arguments Against Fundamentalism by Craig A. Evans

For more connect to us on Facebook or on Twitter @nearemmaus

or follow me on Twitter: @brianleport

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Ben C. Blackwell:

Cyril is one of my favorites.

Originally posted on Cataclysmic:

I grew up in a church setting in which “communion” was not observed regularly. The few times that it was practiced, we utilized a “fast-food” strategy – efficiently passing out individually packaged cups and crackers. For us, communion was one of many possible ways that we remembered the individual forgiveness which we received because of Jesus’ death.

I’ve since learned that communion is not simply one of many ways to worship Jesus but is instead a central way that believers encounter the transforming presence of Christ. One of my teachers regarding the Eucharist was the church father Cyril of Alexandra. Here are a few excerpts from Cyril’s commentary on Luke 22:17-22:

“Christ dwells in us, first, by the Holy Spirit, and we are His abode, according to that which was said of old by one of the holy prophets. ‘For I will dwell in them and lead them, and I will be to them a God, and they shall be to Me a people.’. . …

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This is a great quote by Clement that hits most of his key ideas. I’m doing a comparative piece on Clement and Irenaeus, and the difference between the nature of the image of God is fundamental. Irenaeus places it in the union of the body plus soul, whereas Clement places the image in the soul alone (without vilifying the body):

He is the Gnostic, who is after the image and likeness of God, who imitates God as far as possible, deficient in none of the things which contribute to the likeness as far as compatible, practicing self-restraint and endurance, living righteously, reigning over the passions, bestowing of what he has as far as possible, and doing good both by word and deed. . . . For conformity with the image and likeness is not meant of the body (for it were wrong for what is mortal to be made like what is immortal), but in mind and reason, on which fitly the Lord impresses the seal of likeness, both in respect of doing good and of exercising rule. (Stromateis 2.19)

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