Here’s the Table of Contents from Brevard Childs’ recently published book from Eerdmans: The Canonical Shaping of the Pauline Corpus.  Looks very interesting.  It will be good to see his view of theologically interpreting Paul, especially in light of his Wirkungsgeschichte, which is near and dear to my thesis.

1. The Search for Paul’s Theology 1
I. Recent Historical Attempts 1
II. The Pauline Corpus 3
III. The Hermeneutical Problem of Interpreting the Corpus 7
IV. Historical Criticism and Canonical Context 10
     1. Elements of Continuity 13 
     2. Elements of Discontinuity 15

V. The Role of a Text’s Background 17
VI. Criteria for Canonicity 19
     1. Apostolicity 21
     2. Catholicity 22
     3. Orthodoxy 23

VII. The Biblical Canon and the Problem of Textual Reception 24

2. Alternative Proposals for the Problem of Interpretation 29
I. Ulrich Luz: Wirkungsgeschichte 29
II. Richard B. Hays: Intertextual Reading of Scripture 32
III. Frances Young: The Ethics of Reading Paul 39
     1. The Development of Young’s Understanding 40
     2. A Critical Assessment of Young’s Hermeneutical Proposals 42
IV. Luke T. Johnson: Exegesis and Hermeneutics 46
     1. Johnson’s Interpretive Approach 47
     2. Critical Reflections on Johnson’s Proposals 48

V. Wayne A. Meeks: The Social Context of Pauline Theology 50
     1. Meeks’s Approach Outlined 51
     2. Examples of Meeks’s Social Interpretation 52
     3. A Critical Evaluation of Meeks’s Approach 56
     4. The Role of the Canon and Jesus’ Identity 60

3. The Shaping of the Pauline Corpus 65
I. The Letter to the Romans 65
II. The Pastoral Epistles 69
III. The Hermeneutical Significance of the Canonical Structure 75

4. Exegetical Probes: Introduction and Guidelines 79
I. Paul’s Apostolate and the Gospel 81
     1. Characteristic Features of Paul’s Apostleship 83
     2. The Theological Implications of Canon 96
II. Abraham’s Faith in Galatians 3 and Romans 4 97
     1. J. C. Beker’s Categories of Contingency and Coherence 97
     2. J. Louis Martyn’s Analysis of the Role of the “Teachers” 99
     3. A Canonical Reading of Abraham’s Faith according to Paul 103
     4. Justification in Philippians 108
     5. Justification in the Pastorals 110
     6. Hermeneutical Implications 111
III. Life in the Spirit 112
     1. Romans 8:1-27 113
     2. Galatians 5:13-26 115
     3. The Canonical Relation of Romans 8 and Galatians 5 117
     4. 2 Corinthians 3:1–4:6 122
     5. Richard Hays and Ernst Käsemann on 2 Corinthians 3 135
IV. Community Gifts and Worship 138
     1. 1 Corinthians 12–14 139
     2. Romans 12:1-21 143
     3. Canonical Shaping of Romans 12 and 1 Corinthians 12 145
     4. Ephesians 4:7-16 148
V. The Order of the Church and Its Offices 153
     1. Introduction: The History of the Debate 153
     2. The Pastoral Letters in the Debate 156
     3. The Broadening of the Discussion 157
     4. The Contributions of German Catholic Scholarship 159
     5. Hermeneutical Implications of the Debate 164
VI. The Weak and the Strong 167
     1. 1 Corinthians 8:1–11:1 167
     2. Romans 14:1–15:13 171
     3. Comparison of Corinthians and Romans 173
     4. The Weak and Strong within the Pauline Corpus 175

VII. Israel and the Church: Romans 9–11 178
     1. Form, Function, and Purpose of Romans 9–11 178
     2. Paul’s Gospel Grounded on Israel’s Scriptures 183
     3. The Hermeneutics of Paul’s Use of Scripture 189
     4. The Canonical Function of Romans 9–11 192
VIII. The Apocalyptic Shape of Paul’s Theology 194
     1. The Old Testament Background of Apocalypticism 195
     2. Characteristic Features of Apocalypticism 197
     3. Apocalyptic and the Growth of Early Christianity 199
     4. Apocalyptic Traditions within the Pauline Corpus 206
     5. Theological and Canonical Implications of Apocalyptic 216

5. The Canonical Framing of the Pauline Corpus 219
I. Acts of the Apostles 219
     1. The Debate over the Canonical Role of Luke-Acts 219
     2. The Canonization of Acts 223
     3. The Goals, Purpose, and Function of Acts 226
     4. The Hermeneutical Effect of the Canonization of Acts 231
     5. The Singularity of Paul’s Letters and Their Corporate Form 234
     6. Kähler’s Hermeneutic and the So-called Historical Paul 236

II. Hebrews 237
     1. Critical Issues 237
     2. Major Theological Themes of Continuity 239
     3. Themes of Radical Discontinuity 241
     4. Exhortation and Parenesis 242
     5. The Humanity of Jesus 244
     6. The Major Hermeneutical Issues at Stake 244
     7. Reasons for Inclusion of Hebrews in the Pauline Corpus 248
     8. The Effect of Hebrews within the Pauline Corpus 249

6. Theological Implications of the Pauline Corpus for Interpretation 253
I. The Theological Integrity of a Canonical Reading 253
II. The Canonical Context as an Interpretive Guide 254
III. Canonical Shaping and Reader Interpretation 255
IV. The Hermeneutical Dialectic in Reading the Corpus 255
V. The Historical and Canonical Paul 256
VI. The Christological Content of the Pauline Witness 257
VII. The Faithfulness of God to His Promises 258
VIII. The Eschatological-Apocalyptical Witness of Paul 258

HT: Out of the Silent Planet

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